Vogue 1195 – by Patou

Vogue 1195 Patou with wool crepe pattern woman

I’m kicking off this year’s sewing projects with something very exciting. I acquired this elegant Vintage Vogue dress pattern, ‘designed by Patou’, last year. My plan was to make it in this lovely red wool crepe (pictured above) I have 3 metres of it, usually this is enough for  a dress, so when I come a cross a lovely fabric at a bargain, I’ll buy the 3 metres….

However, when I sat down to read the instructions, and take a good look at ALL of the pieces, and how it comes together, it is looking like I am short a metre of fabric – damn! Aside from the wide front bodice piece, the sleeves are made in two parts, and cut on the bias – lovely, yes, but taking a lot of fabric.

Vogue 1195 Patou pattern contents

Back to the drawing board, in terms of fabric choice, but on with the toile! These vintage sewing patterns are rare, so if you have always wanted to see what they are like, keep reading!

Vogue 1195 Patou pattern pieces detail

This one looks to be unused, or very, very carefully used, the pattern pieces look to be in their factory folds (gulp – handle with care!)

Vogue 1195 Patou pattern pieces pressed

I carefully unfolded the pieces and gently pressed them, just enough for them to lay flat on the fabric (I like to keep the impression of the original fold, as sometimes that’s the only way to pack them up again, yes, I know it’s nerdy). It was at this point that I wondered what on Earth was I thinking! This looks complicated, and oh my goodness look at all the pieces!

The pattern piece notes:

Vogue 1195 Patou pattern pieces illustration

And look at the instruction sheet:

Vogue 1195 Patou instructions

Eek! But not impossible, regardless of how complicated that button up bodice looks…. I have been sewing with vintage sewing patterns, and most often, these punched patterns, for a while now, so this does make sense, I find these easier to look at then the printed patterns.

Vogue 1195 Patou pattern markings

For this project I’m making a full toile, for a couple of reasons, I want to be sure of a good fit, this is the first time working with a Vintage Vogue Designer pattern from the 50s. With the asymmetrical bodice, I suspect any fitting adjustments are going to be more challenging than what I have made before; secondly, the assembly of the front closure looks a bit complicated – I want to make any assembly errors in the toile rather than the fashion fabric!

Vogue 1195 Patou toile cut and ready

All these carefully marked pieces await my attention at the sewing table.

Vogue 1195 Patou toile markings

Here’s that gorgeous pattern illustration again!

Vogue 1195 Patou with wool crepe

Here are some other fabrics I was considering, a lovely grey wool blend, and a (not that nice) synthetic dark green crepe (with a lovely drape) that I will not be using…but are still nice to think about! I am thinking, for the new fabric, green, greys, violets or reds. Fingers crossed for that dream fabric find!

Vogue 1195 Patou with fabric options

3 Comments

  1. Wow, this is a most impressive project. I’ll be looking forward to updates on this one. You have such a meticulous approach to your documenting it’s no wonder your frocks and clothing come out so beautifully.

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  2. looking forward to how it turns out. i am supposed to be trying a patou coat this week, but it will be a lot less complicated (having said that, I hav not cut it yet just graded and traced pattern- cant believe it takes more than the 3m – looking forward to seeing your toile, such an elegant dress

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  3. It’s such a beautiful dress! I’m looking forward to seeing how it will turn out. I can hardly believe a dress with a slim skirt would take more than 3 meters of fabric… Although I have to admit I’ve changed my ‘standard amount’ of fabric to buy when coming across nice stuff cheaply from 3 to 4 meters (but that’s mostly to accommodate full skirts)

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